Herbicide Control of Water Hyacinth to Begin in the Delta March 4th

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION all lanes

Divisions of Boating and Waterways, Historic Preservation and Off-Highway Vehicles
News Release For Immediate Release
February 17, 2015
Contact:
Vicky Waters,
Vicky.Waters@parks.ca.gov
916-653-5115
Herbicide Control of Water Hyacinth to Begin in the Delta in early March

Division of Boating and Waterways will treat four aquatic weeds this year

SACRAMENTO, Calif. —California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) issued a public notice today to begin herbicide treatment of the aquatic invasive weeds Water Hyacinth and Spongeplant in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region beginning on Wednesday, Mar. 4, 2015 and continue through the end of November.

The herbicide treatment will initially focus on the following areas: Middle River, Whiskey Slough, Old River, Coney Island, Indian Slough, Rock Slough, San Joaquin River and the Tuolumne River, with an expansion of treatment to other areas of the Delta beginning on June 1. Spongeplant will be concurrently treated with Water Hyacinth, since both aquatic weeds share common biology and distributions. DBW is permitted to treat 3,500 acres of Water Hyacinth in the Delta.

In addition to the herbicide treatment, DBW is continuing to conduct mechanical harvesting of Water Hyacinth in the South Delta (Old River) and around the Stockton area on an as-needed-basis.

The Division will also begin treatment of Egeria densa and curly leaf pondweed in early March. Treatment areas will be made public next week.

In the 2014 season, 2,617 acres of Water Hyacinth were treated with glyphosate and 2,4-D. There is no known eradication method for Water Hyacinth once it has been established. Therefore, DBW conducts a control program in the Delta as opposed to an eradication program. The program seeks to minimize negative impacts of the invasive plant on navigation, public safety, recreation, agricultural activities and ecosystem services in Delta waterways.

In 1982, California state legislation designated DBW as the lead state agency to cooperate with other state, local and federal agencies in controlling Water Hyacinth in the Delta, its tributaries and the Suisun Marsh. DBW works with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to obtain approval for conducting the Water Hyacinth Control Program from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). A third approval is also obtained from the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. The approval process is in place to determine if the use of these herbicides may affect any threatened, endangered or sensitive species, and critical habitats.

Funding for Water Hyacinth treatment comes from the Harbors and Watercraft Revolving Fund, which receives revenues from boaters’ registration fees and gasoline taxes.

In addition to mechanical harvesting, DBW crews will provide assistance with other removal methods, such as herding and hand-picking, in an effort to continue providing an essential public service.
For Public Notice and treatment area maps, visit this link: http://dbw.parks.ca.gov/PressRoom/2014/140310WaterHyacinth.aspx.

For more information on Water Hyacinth, see the 2015 Water Hyacinth Frequently Asked Questions: http://dbw.parks.ca.gov/PDF/WHCP/FAQ_Water_Hyacinth_2015_FINAL_02-17-15.pdf.

For more information on the Aquatic Invasive Weeds currently treated by DBW, see our Fact Sheet: http://dbw.parks.ca.gov/PDF/FactSheets/Fact_Sheet_1_Controlled_Species.pdf.

To report sightings or for more information regarding the control program, please see DBW’s website at http://www.dbw.parks.ca.gov , call 888-326-2822, or email at AIS@parks.ca.gov.

Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.
California State Parks Mission

To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.

March 08 – Daylight Savings Time 2015

Spring forward…Fall back….                                             all lanes

Daylight Saving Time starts

2 a.m. on the Second Sunday in March

and lasts until

2 a.m. on the First Sunday of November.

 

 

Daylight Savings Time Trivia

Congress established our familiar official time zones (Eastern, Central, Pacific, etc.) in 1918 during World War I. An added portion of the time zone law was a seven-month period of “Daylight Saving” that pushed clocks forward one hour. This provision was repealed shortly thereafter, only to be reinstated during World War II.

Once WWII was over, DST was repealed again, only to crop up again in 1966 as part of the Uniform Time Act, which has since standardized the start and end of DST but allows states to decide if they want to participate.

In the United States, lawmakers chose 2 a.m. for the time change because it was the least disruptive time of day. It’s late enough to not greatly affect bars and restaurants, but it’s before early shift workers and churchgoers begin their days.

There’s a spike in heart attacks during the first week of daylight saving time, according to another study published in 2008. The loss of an hour’s sleep may make people more susceptible to an attack, some experts say. When daylight saving time ends in the fall, heart attacks briefly become less frequent than usual.

People are safer drivers during daylight hours, and researchers have found that DST reduces lethal car crashes and pedestrian strikes. In fact, a study concluded that observing DST year-round would annually prevent about 195 deaths of motor vehicle occupants and about 171 pedestrian fatalities.

Daylight saving time was first used during World War I, as part of an effort in the United States and other warring countries to conserve fuel. In theory, using daylight more efficiently saves fuel and energy because it reduces the nation’s need for artificial light.

The first American to advocate for daylight saving was Benjamin Franklin. He realized in 1784 that many people burned candles at night yet slept past dawn in the summer, wasting early-morning sunlight.

Two states—Arizona and Hawaii—and four U.S. territories—American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands—don’t observe daylight saving time.

The February 25th, 26th and 27th Highway 4 Full Closure Near Antioch, CANCELLED

The closure of all lanes of SR-4 in the eastbound and westbound directions between the SR-4/SR-160 connector ramp and Laurel Road, scheduled to take place on the evenings of February 25th, 26th and 27th from 11:59 pm to 5:00 am have been postponed due to the contractor’s schedule. This work will be rescheduled for next week.

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) are constructing two new connector ramps, one connecting westbound State Route (SR)-4 to northbound SR-160, and one connecting southbound SR-160 to eastbound SR-4 in Contra Costa County. Part of this construction work entails the adjustment of temporary bridge supports that span over SR-4. In order to ensure crew and public safety during this work, the contractor will close all lanes of SR-4 in the eastbound and westbound directions between the SR-4/SR-160 connector ramp and Laurel Road.

Once a new schedule for this work has been determined, a new traffic advisory will be issued to the public.

March 7, 1pm-4pm Spaghetti Feed for Stand down on the Delta

standown

California has 2 million Veterans of which it is estimated that nearly 19,000 are homeless. The Delta Veterans Group is bringing a bi-annual homeless veteran Stand Down to East Contra Costa County – “Stand Down on The Delta” – and looks forward to its beginning September 11 of 2015. The location for the Stand Down will be the Contra Costa Fairgrounds in Antioch, CA.

The services that will be provide are health screenings, dental, legal assistance, veteran’s benefits counseling, shelter placement, hygiene packets and independent living services. This event is designed to give veterans that are homeless another opportunity to reconnect back to their communities.

There are homeless veteran stand downs in Marysville, CA (Yuba-Sutter Veterans Stand Down, The North Bay Stand Down in Dixon, CA, and the East Bay Stand down in Pleasanton, CA). All of the stand downs have two main goals and that is to end veteran homelessness and to assist homeless veterans in making their life as comfortable as possible. Together with local communities we can achieve these goals.

The IRS is Suing You

You may have received a robo-call with a female voice that said the following: “We have been trying to reach you. This call is officially a final notice from IRS, the internal revenue service. The reason of this call is to inform you that the IRS is filing lawsuit against you. To get more information about this case file,IRS_LOGO please call immediately on our department number 360-362-4254″

The area code 360 is very cleverly western Washington outside of Seattle, but it looks official when you see the “Washington” caller ID. First thing I thought was “wrong mark!” and of course I got really interested to see if I could call them back and mess with them, but the line was busy. Too bad, that would have been fun but don’t try this at home.

However, this is another heads-up that these social engineering attacks are happening all the time and are targeting the unsuspecting.

It is tax season and cybercriminals are trying to make money off this opportunity. At the moment, massive amounts of robo-calls are being made claiming that the IRS is suing you, with a callback number in Washington. The same is happening with IRS phishing emails. Don’t try to call the number, and delete the emails. These scammers use high pressure tactics to extort your money. Remember to never give out personal information to anyone unless YOU have initiated the contact.

SR 4/SR 160 Connector Ramps a Pictorial Update – February 2015

The existing State Route 160/Highway 4 interchange currently includes only two of the four possible interchange movements: the eastbound Highway 4 to northbound State Route 160 connector ramp, and the southbound State Route 160 to westbound Highway 4 connector ramp. The State Route 160/Highway 4 Direct Connector Ramps project will construct two new connector ramps, one connecting westbound Highway 4 to northbound State Route 160, and one connecting southbound State Route 160 to eastbound Highway 4.

The project scope includes adding an additional 12-foot auxiliary lane to the outside of existing State Route 160 in both directions between the State Route 160/Highway 4 Interchange and the East 18th/Main Street Interchange, as well as building a soundwall extension and retaining walls.

Construction began in March 2014 and is expected to be completed winter 2015/2016, weather depending.

I recently toured the project with Ivan Ramirez, Contra Costa Transportation (CCTA) Authority Construction Manager. CCTA is a public agency by created Contra Costa voters in 1988 with the passage of Measure C to manage the county’s transportation sales tax program and provide countywide transportation planning and congestion management. It provided for a half-cent sales tax increase for twenty years (through March 2009). In November 2004, Contra Costa County voters approved Measure J with a 71% vote. The measure provided for the continuation of our county’s half-cent transportation sales tax for 25 more years.

Picture Courtesy of CCTA
Picture Courtesy of CCTA
022
The form work is nearly completed for this phase, which spans Highway 4, just east of the Hillcrest exit. This is part of the 160 to 4 connector you see pictured above. The first concrete pour is scheduled for the week of March 9.

017

024
The form work is just beginning on this phase which spans the railroad tracks. This is the Highway 4 – 160 connector
Working on the falsework , consists of temporary structures used in construction to support spanning or arched structures in order to hold the component in place until its construction is sufficiently advanced to support itself.
Working on the falsework , consists of temporary structures used in construction to support spanning or arched structures in order to hold the component in place until its construction is sufficiently advanced to support itself.

040

039

Highway 4 Construction Work – Week of February 23, 2015

The SR-4 corridor construction area is a 55 mph zone and a double fine zone so remember to slow for the cone zone!

Full Freeway Closures

State Route 4:
SR4 will be closed in the eastbound and westbound directions between the SR4/SR160 connector ramp and Laurel Road on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings from 11:59 pm to 5:00 am.

all lanes

State Route 160:
There are no eastbound or westbound full freeway closures of State Route 160 planned for this week.

Highway Lane Closures

State Route 4:
There will be highway lane closures in the westbound direction of SR4 between California Avenue/Harbor Street and Bailey Road Monday through Friday between 11:00 am and 5:00 pm and on Friday evening from 6:00 pm to 10:00 am.

There will be highway lane closures in the westbound direction of SR4 between Somersville Road and Loveridge Road on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

There will be highway lane closures in the eastbound and westbound directions of SR4 between the SR4/SR160 connector ramp and Laurel Road on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings from 10:00 pm to 6:00 am.

State Route 160:
There are no highway lane closures planned for this week.

Ramp Closures

State Route 4:
The SR4 eastbound on ramp at Sand Creek Road will be closed on Monday evening from 10:00 pm to 1:00 am.

Sand Creek EASTBOUND ON-RAMP CLOSURE

There will be lane closures on the SR4 eastbound off ramp at Sand Creek Road on Tuesday from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm.

There will be lane closures on the SR4 westbound off ramp at Sand Creek Road on Tuesday from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm.

State Route 160:
There are no ramp closures for State Route 160 planned for this week.

Local Street Closures

There will be single lane closures on Lone Tree Way in both directions between Canada Valley Road and Jeffery Way Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm.

There will be single lane closures on Sand Creek Road in both directions between the SR4 eastbound and westbound on and off ramps on Tuesday from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm.

Questions or comments can be directed to the Highway 4 widening hotline at (925) 756-0721 or visit our web site at http://widensr4.org.